TRAVEL GUIDE TO NEW ZEALAND

About 2,000 kilometers (1,300 miles) southeast of Australia, in the South Pacific Ocean, is the island nation of New Zealand (NZ). The North Island (Te-Ika-a-Maui) and the South Island (Te Wai Pounamu), which are divided by the Cook Strait, are the two main islands that make up the island nation. Australia, the island countries of Fiji and Tonga, and New Zealand all share maritime borders.
The land area of Zealandia is made up of the islands of New Zealand. The majority of the former supercontinent Gondwanaland, today known as Zealandia, is currently underwater.
The Cook Islands, the Ross Dependency, the island of Niue, the coral atolls of Tokelau, and New Zealand together up the geopolitical entity known as the Realm of New Zealand.
The country is around the size of the US State of Colorado, or slightly larger than the United Kingdom (242,900 km2).
The population of New Zealand is 5.1 million (beginning 2021). The nation’s largest metropolis, Auckland, is located in Wellington, the capital. The two most common languages are Mori, the native tongue of the Mori people of New Zealand, and English (95%) together.

TRAVEL VISA REQUIREMENTS FOR NEW ZEALAND

The New Zealand government requires that you apply for a visa before you travel to New Zealand.

New Zealand citizens, holders of diplomatic and official passports and those who hold a current valid passport from Australia, the United Kingdom, Canada or the United States are not required to apply for a visa on arrival.

For citizens of other countries planning to visit New Zealand, the following information is provided:

Valid passport from your country (valid for at least 3 months after your arrival in New Zealand).

A completed application form.

A completed sponsorship form if travelling as part of a tour group.

A return ticket or proof of onward travel arrangements (if applicable).

GEOGRAPHY OF NEW ZEALAND

New Zealand, with its unique and beautiful landscape, is known as the “Land of the Long White Cloud.” The country is also called the “Spiritual Home of Maori” because it was here that the first Polynesian settlers arrived over 4000 years ago.

New Zealand’s landscape is diverse, with numerous volcanoes, glaciers, lakes and rivers. Its flora includes many species of subtropical plants. The most famous are the kiwi bird (or kiwi), giant flightless birds that live exclusively in New Zealand forests; they have been declared a national treasure.

The nation also has an abundance of fauna species: whales, dolphins, seals and sea lions can be seen throughout the country during summer months whilst fur seals can be found on remote beaches around New Zealand’s South Island.

The Kauri Tree (Agathis australis) is one of New Zealand’s most famous trees. A native species to many parts of New Zealand, it grows to between 80-120m tall and has a trunk diameter up to 2m wide at its base. It was once thought that Kauri trees grew only in Northland but since 2003 scientists have discovered new groves in locations such as Whangarei Harbour.

TRAVEL SAFETY IN NEW ZEALAND

New Zealand is known as the “Land of the Long White Cloud” and it is easy to see why. The country is covered in snow until June, but it also has a temperate climate that allows for year round outdoor activities. The country is blessed with a wealth of natural beauty that makes it an ideal place for travelers to explore.

New Zealand has some of the safest roads in the world, but even with this fact, there are still dangers on many roads and highways throughout the country. There are several ways you can help avoid accidents when driving in New Zealand.

Always Drive Safely

Driving conditions vary greatly from place to place throughout New Zealand, so always drive according to road conditions and weather conditions when driving outside urban areas. If you see a hazard ahead on the road, slow down or stop completely if possible. Never enter an intersection if there is a vehicle approaching from behind you on another street or road; always wait until they have passed before proceeding through an intersection or turning right/left at a junction. Always wear your seatbelt while driving and make sure children are buckled up as well!

MONEY AND BANKS IN NEW ZEALAND

Money and banks in New Zealand are the same as in the United Kingdom. The main difference is that the Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) does not issue banknotes, but issues only banknotes for circulation. Instead it issues cheques, which are accepted as legal tender by all banks.

Bank notes were issued by the RBNZ from 1934 onwards, with a different design every year until 1966. The first note was £1, but these were replaced by coins because they became too small to fit into vending machines.

The RBNZ issues different types of bank notes depending on their value:

5c, 10c, 20c and 50c notes – These can be used in exchange for goods and services anywhere in New Zealand. However some businesses may require customers to pay with cash or cheques (or possibly credit cards). Some smaller retailers also refuse to accept 5c and 10c banknotes due to their small size and value (which is low) compared with larger denominations like $20 or $50 bills.

$1 and $2 banknotes – These can only be used at banks or post offices. They cannot be used for most transactions around town such as buying food from supermarkets or getting groceries from shops.

FOOD AND DRINKS IN NEW ZEALAND

Food and drinks in New Zealand are not only diverse but also very tasty. There are many different cuisines to choose from, including Indian and Thai food, European and American cuisine, as well as seafood.

New Zealand has a great selection of beers, wines and spirits. Many bars have a good selection of local beer on tap or in bottles. Beer is usually cheaper than other alcoholic beverages.

New Zealand’s wine industry is growing rapidly with more than 200 wineries now operating in the country. Most vineyards are located in the South Island, with nearly half located in Marlborough alone. Wines produced from grapes grown at these vineyards include both red and white varieties.

The most popular local distilled spirits are Vodka and Gin, which are widely available throughout New Zealand. Vodka is made from potatoes and water while Gin is made by distilling grain such as wheat or rye with juniper berries and other botanicals such as angelica roots.

CULTURE OF NEW ZEALAND

The culture of New Zealand is a unique fusion of indigenous and immigrant cultures. The blending of these two cultures has created a unique country, different from any other nation in the world.

The culture of New Zealand is very similar to that of Australia but with more emphasis on sports, especially rugby and cricket. There are many similarities between the two countries because they both have a high population of inhabitants that are descendants from immigrants who came from Britain during the mid 19th century. In fact, New Zealand became a British colony in 1840, which further reinforced its ties with Britain.

However, there are also differences between New Zealand and Australia because it has been inhabited by Maori people for thousands of years before European settlers arrived several hundred years ago. The Maori people had their own language and customs before British settlers arrived in the 1850s. After this time period was over, the Maori people were integrated into mainstream society as they were given land and other resources by the government while they kept their traditions alive through spirituality such as tribal rituals and ceremonies performed on special occasions such as births among others; although most now live in cities rather than traditional villages or townships where they could still practice their traditional lifestyles as well as maintain close ties with nature.

TRAVEL SAFETY IN NEW ZEALAND

New Zealand is known as the “Land of the Long White Cloud” and it is easy to see why. The country is covered in snow until June, but it also has a temperate climate that allows for year round outdoor activities. The country is blessed with a wealth of natural beauty that makes it an ideal place for travelers to explore.

New Zealand has some of the safest roads in the world, but even with this fact, there are still dangers on many roads and highways throughout the country. There are several ways you can help avoid accidents when driving in New Zealand.

Always Drive Safely

Driving conditions vary greatly from place to place throughout New Zealand, so always drive according to road conditions and weather conditions when driving outside urban areas. If you see a hazard ahead on the road, slow down or stop completely if possible. Never enter an intersection if there is a vehicle approaching from behind you on another street or road; always wait until they have passed before proceeding through an intersection or turning right/left at a junction. Always wear your seatbelt while driving and make sure children are buckled up as well!

HOW TO REACH NEW ZEALAND

There are some easy ways to get to New Zealand:

Fly. New Zealand’s main international airport is Auckland Airport, which serves flights from around the world. See our page on flying to New Zealand for details on transportation options, including flights and car rentals.

Drive. New Zealand is one of the most scenic countries in the world, and it’s easy to drive there from North America. You can drive up from Alaska or British Columbia, or head south from Vancouver Island or the Yukon Territory. Drivers can get all the way down through Montana and into central Utah before turning north again toward New Zealand at Moab, Utah.

Take an overnight cruise ship from Asia or Australia to New Zealand. There are many different cruises available that depart from ports around the world (including Australia) and stop in several major cities along their route before landing in Auckland Harbor for a few hours before departing again for homeport ports such as Sydney, Melbourne or Singapore.

BEST TIME TO VISIT NEW ZEALAND

The summer months of December to March are the finest for travelling to New Zealand because of the long, sunny days and warm temperatures (16°C to 24°C).They’re ideal for visiting the stunning beaches or taking advantage of the many opportunities for outdoor activity, such as mountain biking and hiking.

However, the nation is a wonderful place to travel at any time of year due to its untamed beauty and diverse landscapes. Just be aware that whenever you decide to visit, it may rain very frequently.

Snow is likely to fall in the South Island from June through September, as well as in some of the more mountainous regions of the North Island, drawing skiers from far and wide. With temperatures in the mid-teens, the spring and fall months bring milder weather and fewer tourists, but they are still excellent times to travel.

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